S. Sudan’s journalist commits suicide attempt over quarrelsome wife

South Sudan’s local journalist commits suicide attempt over his quarrelsome wife | Courtesy

Depressed, a South Sudanese journalist, Makur Chol Khor, took to social media on Sunday evening — announcing his death before police officers stormed his house and rescued him from a hanging noose.

“Dear friends, relatives, in-laws, work mates and country mates. Something is beyond my control in my life, she married to me and I give good care of her in all time we have spent and now she’s turning threats to my life. I’m ready to leave this world, you guys remain in peace,” said Chol in a Facebook post shared widely on social media.

Chol is a well-known journalist who has worked for a number of local and international news organizations in South Sudan.

He was a former Program Manager at Radio Jonglei 95.9 FM, South Sudan Broadcasting Corporation (SSBC) and the Voice of American (VOA).

Stress, that usually leads to depression and suicide can be effectively controlled by applying five stress management techniques, such as physical exercise, taking deep breaths, relaxing when stressed, and prioritizing your hobbies.

South Sudan’s government has no Crisis Helplines that play a key role in preventing suicide cases across the country.

Last year, the International Committee of the Red Cross noted that the number of suicides due to lack of services and violence has increased dramatically.

“October 10th marks World Mental Health Day, an untold number of people in South Sudan are struggling with depression, anxiety, and other mental health problems caused by conflict and violence and not receiving the support they need, especially in rural areas.”

“Mental health is just as important as physical health and more needs to be done to ensure that people have access to the care they need, and that they don’t face stigma for seeking help,” said Fiona Allan, the mental health and psychosocial support manager for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in South Sudan.

“In South Sudan, there are things that people fear to talk about,” said Thimon Ozinga Ismail, ICRC’s mental health and psychosocial support field officer in Juba. They fear that talking about mental issues can spoil the family history, the community or the clan history. They also fear that people will think they are wicked, mad, or that if they raise these issues, it would bring violence to their family.”